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Latest VR News

Lenovo and Pico announce Mirage VR S3 all-in-one enterprise headset


While Lenovo has gradually refocused its mixed reality ambitions on enterprise customers, it has remained interested in producing headsets that will be shared by average users in classrooms, museums, and doctors’ offices. To that end, the company today announced a new all-in-one enterprise headset called Mirage VR S3, featuring 4K displays and a more easily cleanable face plate deemed “suitable for mass use” in the COVID-19 era.

Interestingly, the Mirage VR S3 was codeveloped with Pico, which recently started shipping higher-end Neo 2 and Neo 2 Eye enterprise headsets under its own branding. While Lenovo’s model is similarly capable of standalone operation, it uses a less powerful Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 system-on-chip and 3DoF tracking, compared with Neo 2’s Snapdragon 845 processor and 6DoF tracking. But it packs two 2160 x 1920 displays, a 101-degree field of view, and greater than three-hour battery life, all within a relatively light 1.04-pound housing that’s compatible with eyeglasses.

The carefully balanced specs are designed to appeal to health care providers, for use cases that include both practitioner training and patient therapy, as well as to educators seeking affordable, safer VR alternatives to field trips and lab experiments. Lenovo also expects the Mirage VR S3 to be used for enterprise safety instruction, law enforcement high-risk scenario training, and executive soft skills development — applications that might otherwise be handled by an Oculus Go but will benefit from the S3’s higher resolution and ergonomic improvements.



HTC CEO Presents 5G-enabled VR headset 


Mova is standalone VR headset that does away with motion controllers, instead offering optical hand tracking which users will use to navigate UI and interact with others online. Like Samsung Gear VR and Oculus Go, the headset only includes a single remote, which appears to have a touchpad and basic button array for basic input.

The company is looking to appeal more to a wider set of users who aren’t necessarily gamepad savvy. Along with optical hand tracking comes room-scale tracking, making Mova closer to Oculus Quest or Pico Neo 2 in function.


“We want people just to use their hands for main navigation,” Chou says. “We think everybody knows how to use their hands; there’s no learning barrier. Your hands are always with you—you don’t have to carry them. And hands are free.”

Its optical sensors are also capable of room scanning, the company says, making a photorealistic version of your play space by uploading textures and depth data to the cloud for processing.

Hardware specs are still not entirely clear, however Mova is said to offer 5G, LTE and Wi-Fi connectivity built on the back of a Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 chipset. The company claims a 20% reduction in weight over Oculus Quest, a larger battery, greater DPI display (no resolution just yet) clocked at a 90Hz refresh rate.



Oculus is celebrating one-year anniversary of Oculus Quest with hand-tracking for all



It's been a year since Oculus Quest started shipping. The popular, wire-free VR headset has done well in that time and now is seeing some great updates to make things even more interesting.

This is a brilliant update to an already fantastic VR headset as it doesn't require any extra purchases or additional peripherals in order to work. It's merely a software update that allows the inside-out tracking cameras to monitor the movement of your fingers instead of the controllers. 

The company has also said that it'll be accepting third-party titles with hand-tracking capabilities later this month as well. This means we should see more and more games where you can go controller free in the near future.



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Latest VR News

Lenovo and Pico announce Mirage VR S3 all-in-one enterprise headset


While Lenovo has gradually refocused its mixed reality ambitions on enterprise customers, it has remained interested in producing headsets that will be shared by average users in classrooms, museums, and doctors’ offices. To that end, the company today announced a new all-in-one enterprise headset called Mirage VR S3, featuring 4K displays and a more easily cleanable face plate deemed “suitable for mass use” in the COVID-19 era.

Interestingly, the Mirage VR S3 was codeveloped with Pico, which recently started shipping higher-end Neo 2 and Neo 2 Eye enterprise headsets under its own branding. While Lenovo’s model is similarly capable of standalone operation, it uses a less powerful Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 system-on-chip and 3DoF tracking, compared with Neo 2’s Snapdragon 845 processor and 6DoF tracking. But it packs two 2160 x 1920 displays, a 101-degree field of view, and greater than three-hour battery life, all within a relatively light 1.04-pound housing that’s compatible with eyeglasses.

The carefully balanced specs are designed to appeal to health care providers, for use cases that include both practitioner training and patient therapy, as well as to educators seeking affordable, safer VR alternatives to field trips and lab experiments. Lenovo also expects the Mirage VR S3 to be used for enterprise safety instruction, law enforcement high-risk scenario training, and executive soft skills development — applications that might otherwise be handled by an Oculus Go but will benefit from the S3’s higher resolution and ergonomic improvements.



HTC CEO Presents 5G-enabled VR headset


Mova is standalone VR headset that does away with motion controllers, instead offering optical hand tracking which users will use to navigate UI and interact with others online. Like Samsung Gear VR and Oculus Go, the headset only includes a single remote, which appears to have a touchpad and basic button array for basic input.

The company is looking to appeal more to a wider set of users who aren’t necessarily gamepad savvy. Along with optical hand tracking comes room-scale tracking, making Mova closer to Oculus Quest or Pico Neo 2 in function.



“We want people just to use their hands for main navigation,” Chou says. “We think everybody knows how to use their hands; there’s no learning barrier. Your hands are always with you—you don’t have to carry them. And hands are free.”

Its optical sensors are also capable of room scanning, the company says, making a photorealistic version of your play space by uploading textures and depth data to the cloud for processing.

Hardware specs are still not entirely clear, however Mova is said to offer 5G, LTE and Wi-Fi connectivity built on the back of a Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 chipset. The company claims a 20% reduction in weight over Oculus Quest, a larger battery, greater DPI display (no resolution just yet) clocked at a 90Hz refresh rate.



Oculus is celebrating one-year anniversary of Oculus Quest with hand-tracking for all



It's been a year since Oculus Quest started shipping. The popular, wire-free VR headset has done well in that time and now is seeing some great updates to make things even more interesting. 

This is a brilliant update to an already fantastic VR headset as it doesn't require any extra purchases or additional peripherals in order to work. It's merely a software update that allows the inside-out tracking cameras to monitor the movement of your fingers instead of the controllers. 

The company has also said that it'll be accepting third-party titles with hand-tracking capabilities later this month as well. This means we should see more and more games where you can go controller free in the near future.